State Parks and Recreation Sites

Lewis & Clark National and State Historical Park

Explore the timeless rainforests and majestic coastal vistas. Discover the rich heritage of the Native people. Unfold the dramatic stories of America’s most famous explorers.

The Park encompasses sites along the Columbia River and the Pacific Coast. Follow the explorer’s footsteps and have an adventure in history.

 

Fort Stevens State Park

Fort Stevens was once the primary military defense installation in the three-fort, Harbor Defense System at the mouth of the Columbia River (Forts Canby and Columbia in Washington were the other two). The fort was in service for 84 years, beginning during the Civil War and closing at the end of World War II. Today, Fort Stevens has grown into a 4,200 acre park offering exploration of history, nature, and many recreational opportunities.

Camping, beach-combing, freshwater lake swimming, trails, wildlife viewing, a historic shipwreck, and a historic military fort make Fort Stevens a uniquely diverse park. The park also boasts a network of nine miles of paved bicycle trails and six miles of hiking trails that allow you to explore a variety of habitats including spruce and hemlock forests, wetlands, dunes, and shore pine areas.

Coffenbury Lake has two swimming areas, a picnic area, restrooms, and a boat ramp. Two neighboring, smaller lakes are great for fishing and canoeing.

Throughout the year, you can browse through displays ranging from the Civil War to World War II at the military museum and information center, walk through the only Civil War era earthen fort on the west coast, or explore the many turn-of-the-century, concrete coast artillery gun batteries.

During the summer, take a tour underground through a rare gun battery that also served as a World War II command center, ride in the back of a period military transport truck and see the fortifications from a whole new perspective, or get a feel for what the inside of a military jail was like as you walk through one of the last brick constructed guard houses in the country. 

 

Astoria Column

Modeled after the Trajan Column in Rome, the Astoria Column features a hand-painted spiral frieze that would stretch more than 500 feet if unwound. The monument was dedicated in 1926, and has since undergone several restorations.

 

Clatsop Spit

The spit lies wholly within Fort Stevens State Park. Begin the hike at Parking Lot D and walk to the wildlife viewing blind overlooking the tidal flats of Jetty Lagoon, also called Trestle Bay. The 6 ½ mile South Jetty stretches from Point Adams across the lagoon and is accompanied by the ruins of a wooden trestle, which carried the trains used in the jetty’s construction.